Tolkien'S Essay On Fairy Stories

Tolkien'S Essay On Fairy Stories-39
Tolkien sets out to answer three main questions in his On Fairy Stories: What are fairy stories? Eventually he arrives at his own definition, defining the fairy-story as: In this section he also discusses ' Faërie' as being something that satisfies certain primordial human desires, which include:- the desire to “survey the depths of space and time” and - the desire to “hold communion with other living things." In this part of the treatise he looks at the origins of fairy stories.The main assertion he makes in this section is, interestingly, that we shouldn't be concerned with unravelling the history and origins of fairy-stories, but rather with understanding what they mean to us now and "what values the long alchemic processes of time have produced in them."He criticises studies that compare and analyse fairy stories just by looking at certain elements of them (such as similar myths and ideas) rather than understanding them as whole units or experiences.

Tolkien sets out to answer three main questions in his On Fairy Stories: What are fairy stories? Eventually he arrives at his own definition, defining the fairy-story as: In this section he also discusses ' Faërie' as being something that satisfies certain primordial human desires, which include:- the desire to “survey the depths of space and time” and - the desire to “hold communion with other living things." In this part of the treatise he looks at the origins of fairy stories.The main assertion he makes in this section is, interestingly, that we shouldn't be concerned with unravelling the history and origins of fairy-stories, but rather with understanding what they mean to us now and "what values the long alchemic processes of time have produced in them."He criticises studies that compare and analyse fairy stories just by looking at certain elements of them (such as similar myths and ideas) rather than understanding them as whole units or experiences.

This turning moment must create joy and a lifting of the heart, and satisfaction.

This joy is likened to the glimpsing of underlying truth.

As Tolkien describes it, for the one who beholds a Faërian drama, “[t]he experience may be very similar to Dreaming…

But in Faërian drama you are in a dream that some other mind is weaving, and the knowledge of that alarming fact may slip from your grasp…

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Tolkien'S Essay On Fairy Stories Ed History Papers Gcse

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He believes that such a presumption would see children as an ‘other’, and not just a more immature part of the larger family of human beings: He also cites his own taste for fairy stories as having come to him most strongly in adulthood.

Then he outlines four key things he believes fairy stories offer to readers (Which he believes are more necessary to adults than to children): Fantasy Recovery Escape Consolation Fantasy He uses the term 'fantasy' to basically mean the act of creating something imaginary and new.

Fantasy, as Tolkien defines it, has to do with the human mind’s remarkable ability to compose strange and unreal images, combined with the power of human “Art” to craft entire imaginary yet internally consistent worlds in which these strange images find themselves at home.

Yet the purpose of such strange imaginings, Tolkien explains, is not simply Fantasy for its own sake, but what he calls “Recovery,” the act of freeing things “from the drab blur of triteness or familiarity—from possessiveness,” by helping us see the world afresh in all its startling beauty and its own, authentic and “arresting strangeness.” In the course of discussing Fantasy, Tolkien further introduces the fascinating and pedagogically suggestive notion of what he calls “Faërian Drama.” By Faërian drama, Tolkien means those plays or stories that are performed or told by the elves or fairies, paradoxically, a fairy story for a human audience.

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