Critical Essay William Wordsworth

Critical Essay William Wordsworth-12
What is interesting here is that, on account of his upbringing, whereby he learned to disdain the feudal values of “wealth and titles,” in favor of republican ideals such as “talents, worth, and prosperous industry,” Wordsworth hailed the first part of the Revolution as simply an expression of “nature’s certain course” (IX, 215–247).Wordsworth’s devotion to nature was lifelong; from first to last, he viewed himself as a follower of nature. And finally, as sum and crown of all, Should see the people having a strong hand In framing their own laws; whence better days To all mankind.(XI, 393–395) And he addresses his friend Coleridge, commending their common turning toward nature for solace and restoration, after the tumultuous events which have proved to be a “sorrowful reverse for all mankind” (XI, 404).

What is interesting here is that, on account of his upbringing, whereby he learned to disdain the feudal values of “wealth and titles,” in favor of republican ideals such as “talents, worth, and prosperous industry,” Wordsworth hailed the first part of the Revolution as simply an expression of “nature’s certain course” (IX, 215–247).Wordsworth’s devotion to nature was lifelong; from first to last, he viewed himself as a follower of nature. And finally, as sum and crown of all, Should see the people having a strong hand In framing their own laws; whence better days To all mankind.(XI, 393–395) And he addresses his friend Coleridge, commending their common turning toward nature for solace and restoration, after the tumultuous events which have proved to be a “sorrowful reverse for all mankind” (XI, 404).

Tags: Der Existentialismus Ist Ein Humanismus Und Andere Philosophische EssaysCorporate Strategy ThesisHow To Solve A Problem In A RelationshipAno Ang Term Paper Sa TagalogAbraham Lincoln Assassination Research PaperOcr Gcse Product Design CourseworkPesticide EssayCreative Writing Topics For College StudentsEssays In Love Writer De Botton Crossword

His return to nature is marked by a balancing of reason (the “head”) with the counsels of the heart; by a vision of human life as extending beyond merely present concerns to encompass past and future; by an assertion of certain ideals, such as liberty, as timelessly valid.

The most elemental factor in Wordsworth’s return to nature was imagination.

The French became “oppressors in their turn,” changing “a war of self-defence / For one of conquest, losing sight of all / Which they had struggled for” (XI, 206–209). (XI, 250–254) While Wordsworth insists that he will always retain this aspiration toward human liberty, he notes also that he fell into errors, betrayed by false reasonings that had turned him aside “From Nature’s way by outward accidents” (XI, 288–291).

Wordsworth is referring to the French aggression against Spain, Italy, Holland, and Germany in 1794–1795. what seemed A more exalted nature; wished that Man Should start out of his earthy, worm-like state, And spread abroad the wings of Liberty, Lord of himself . Despairing of moral questions, and losing his faith in the authority of abstract reason alone, he describes himself as turning to the realm of “abstract science” where reason might operate undisturbed by the world of space and time, matter, and “human will and power” (XI, 328–332).

In , Wordsworth also recalls his progress from a merely sensual to an imaginative apprehension of nature, which allows him to see the unity of nature in itself as well as the unity of humankind with nature: he perceives in “the round ocean and the living air, / And the blue sky, and in the mind of man: / A motion and a spirit, that impels / All thinking things, all objects of all thought, / And rolls through all things” (Wordsworth opposes such insight as furnished by the imagination to conventional education, the conventional misleading “wisdom” of books, and the stunting of the passions by overcrowded life in the cities where “the human heart is sick.” Such wisdom, he states, is fostered by the wealthy few in the service of their own interests (XIII, 169–212).

The poet above all, having the gift of imagination, apprehends a “mighty scheme of truth,” and, exercising his mind upon “the vulgar form of present things” and the appearances of the everyday world, discerns “a new world” that is founded on permanent and universal principles (XIII, 300–312, 355–370).The idea here seems to be that imagination is an intermediary power that stands above both reason and sense even as it connects them.Imagination, in its capacity as “right reason,” orients our sensibility to the things that are truly universal and permanent; by implication, a “wrong” use of reason, abstracted entirely from things of the sense, would either impel us to impose false schemes upon the world of sense, or to be at the mercy of the world of sense, taking this alone as reality, and understanding its own function as ordering this reality which is already given, already presented to our senses.What is striking, at this point of his autobiographical masterpiece, is the of nature – a concept fundamental to the work of nearly all Romantic poets – with certain political events, events directed, at least in theory, toward a “government of equal rights” and a republic where, as Wordsworth states, “all stood thus far / Upon equal ground,” and where “we were brothers all / In honour, as in one community” (IX, 226–228). the earth Unthwarted in her wish to recompense The meek, the lowly, the patient child of toil, . (IX, 522–532) Wordsworth even names the violent outbursts against prevailing power as “Nature’s rebellion against monstrous law” (IX, 571).Nature is regarded by Wordsworth as a fundamental unity, and here a human community resting on equality is held to be an integral part of that unity. He states also that “nothing hath a natural right to last / But equity and reason” (IX, 205–206).In contrast, imagination frees us from what Wordsworth calls this “tyranny” of sense, bringing us to the realization that we are in our interaction with nature and the world, and that the “mind is lord and master” over outward sense (XII, 127–136, 203–206, 222–223).In this passage Wordsworth makes his celebrated declaration that there are in our existence “spots of time,” or moments of imaginative insight, whereby our minds are “nourished” and renovated above the “deadly weight” of trivial and present occupations.There, he saw “the Revolutionary Power / Toss like a ship at anchor, rocked by storms,” and witnessed how the “silent zephyrs sported with the dust / Of the Bastille” (IX, 50–51, 66–67).He describes the time as “an hour / Of universal ferment,” and himself as a “patriot” whose heart was given over to the French people (IX, 123–124, 161–162).It was Wordsworth who wrote the following famous lines about the French Revolution as it first appeared to many of its sympathizers: Bliss was it in that dawn to be alive, But to be young was very Heaven! It is no accident that many Romantic theories of literature were forged in the heat of such revolutionary enthusiasm.O times, In which the meagre, stale, forbidding ways Of custom, law, and statute, took at once The attraction of a country in romance! But, as Wordsworth’s own modified reactions reveal, Romantic literary theory has an oblique and complex, often contradictory, connection with the ideals behind – and the reality of – the Revolution.

SHOW COMMENTS

Comments Critical Essay William Wordsworth

The Latest from vkusnosup.ru ©